Faulder Family Genealogy

15 September, 2021

Williamson: Current Research

Link between myself and the Williamsons
Link between myself and the Williamsons

Currently a number of events have brought my focus back to the Williamson Family – my maternal grandmother’s family (through my mother’s adoption).

The purpose of this post is to summarise the current areas of research and what is being done (September 2021) in order to help others and via search engines to catch the attention of people currently unknown to me who may be researching the same family.

Currently we know of the Williamsons in Cork in the first half of the 19th Century, later emerging in Worcester in England in the 1861 Census. That same census indicates that there was a branch of the family in New Jersey United States.

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7 September, 2021

The Blizard Name

My mother’s adoptive mother’s paternal grandfather (my Grandmother’s Grandfather) was William Blizard Williamson (born Cork, Ireland 1811, died Worcester, England 1878). He had two sons: William Blizard Williamson (the younger) and George Henry Williamson – my grandmother’s father.

I have written previously about them. This post ponders the origin of the Blizard name in our family tree and whether knowing that helps identify further ancestors or the geographical origin of the Williamsons. (There is a rumour that they may have originated in England and another that they originated in Londonderry.)

This post summarises what I know about the name (not much) and what I would like to know. It is a work-in-progress both in terms of research and content editing. Suggestions are very welcome!

This post also details the genealogy of Sir William Blizard (1743-1835), a surgeon and founder of the first medical school attached to a hospital, The London Hospital. It may be that William Blizard Williamson was named after this famous person, but if anyone reading this identifies a genealogical link between the two of them … .

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12 July, 2021

The Family of James Keighley (1805-1888)

Faulder to Keighley Ancestry

James Keighley was my Great Great Great Grandfather. His daughter Martha (1834-1920) married Robert Fell (1924-1910) and their eldest child, Elizabeth Fell (1856-1929) was the mother of my paternal Grandmother, Marjorie Lendrum (1887-1963).

Reconstructing James’s family or families is of interest not just because he is at the time of writing the most distant Keighley relative but also because of two outstanding genealogical itches:

  • The identity of “Granny’s sister and her bridesmaid” – an elderly woman standing behind Martha Fell in Robert and Martha’s Golden Wedding Photograph at Somerville, Hungerford Road, Huddersfield – the annotation written from the perspective of someone of the same generation as my Grandmother Marjorie Lendrum.

As a “read” it is probably only of interest to Keighley, Fell and Ramsden relatives and those wanting to find out a bit more about the two posts referenced in the paragraphs above.

genealogy

5 April, 2021

On This Day; 5 April 1981 – Census

On 5 April 1981 the 1981 UK Census was taken. Normally this is not a particular issue but for my mother it was. She was adopted but had traced her birth mother. On the approach to Census night she realised that she would be staying with her birth mother that night so would be listed as a “visitor” on her mother’s household census form.

This meant her mother would have to record their relationship. In 1981 this was “a secret” and left my mother in a quandary; knowing her mother had promised her (later) husband that she would keep my mother’s existence a secret but also knowing she wanted to be honest – how could she complete the form?

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30 August, 2020

Are We Related: George Willett (1. b ~1862 at Whitechapel)

This post, and its pair, is in response to a comment about a possible relationship between the Willetts (from Colchester – “my ancestors”, as researched elsewhere on this website) and a line of Willetts in the East End of London. The key link seems to be a George Willett born around 1862 or 1863.

This post examines how I am related to this George Willett. A second post looks at the other line.

genealogy

Are We Related: George Willett (2. b ~1862 at Henham)

This post, and its pair, is in response to a comment about a possible relationship between the Willetts (from Colchester – “my ancestors” as researched elsewhere on this website) and a line of Willetts in the East End of London identified by Lee Willett. The key link seems to be a George Willett born around 1862 or 1863. Branches of the Colchester Willetts migrated to the East End.

The first post revalidated how I am related to the George Willett born in Whitechapel – a descendant of Everard Willett of Colchester. This post examines how Lee’s ancestors may be related to this George Willett.

genealogy

18 May, 2020

On this day: 18 May 1918

“On the night of 18th May 1918, members of the St Omer Convoy were called out to evacuate patients after a bombing raid had hit a local ammunition dump.”

First Military Medals awarded to the FANY” – FANY website [accessed 18 May 2020]

The FANY as they are almost always know were the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry, a group of predominantly women with the possibly fanciful idea of combining their horsewomanship and first aid ability to be of service to the British military. They envisaged they could gallop out on to the battlefield to retrieve the wounded and carry them back to the lines where First Aid could be applied. In reality this romantic idea evolved rapidly in World War One into driving heavy motor ambulances – initially for the French and Belgians because the British wanted nothing to do with them.

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30 January, 2020

WW2 Evacuation and the Start of WW2

I have been reading through the memoirs of my late mother, then Elizabeth Willett, and trying to “decode” them. Because she was adopted she changed names and places to protect the anonymity of her birth family. However she encoded almost everything – even events that had no bearing on her birth family!

Most recently I have been looking at her description of being evacuated at the beginning of World War 2. Her details in the 1939 register are still redacted (it takes some time for them to unredact details of recently deceased people – it seems they are running at least 15 months behind), so I was not sure where she was sent.

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5 June, 2019

On This Day: 75 Years Ago: D-Day

My late mother, then Elizabeth Willett, was almost 14 in June 1944. In her memoirs she wrote of her memories of D-Day. She was away at boarding school (Sherborne Girls School) in Dorset.

During the night of the 5th – 6th of June 1944, every girl in my house was woken by the staff and prefects to watch the gliders being towed over to Normandy at the start of D-Day.

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11 November, 2018

On this day 100 years ago: Armistice

One hundred years on it is hard to imagine the impact of the Armistice. I was too young to discuss it with any of my relatives who survived the war. I imagine amidst the celebrations there would have been a sad reckoning.
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