Faulder Family Genealogy

25 May, 2015

The Willetts of Colchester, Essex (and Daylight Saving) 1 of 2

The change to and from British Summer Time can bring about a flurry of interest in William Willett, the original advocate in Britain of Daylight Saving. For some reason this spring Google and that ilk have pointed a larger number of people than usual towards this family blog. Some of them have familiar family stories about being related to “Daylight Saving” Willett.

In addition another comment by a relative (about William Willett senior – Daylight Saving Willett’s father – running away from his step-mother) has prompted me to re-examine “the top” of the Willett tree as I have previously understood it.

(more…)

24 August, 2010

William Willett (b 1837) Founder of the building firm

There are (at least) two notable William Willetts. The most notable two are probably the father and son pair; the son (b 1856) is noted as the advocate of Daylight Saving, whilst his father is noted for founding the building firm Willetts. (more…)

23 August, 2010

Willett Antecedents

The early Willetts take a bit of disentangling due to second marriages and marriages to other Willetts. (more…)

The life of HDS (Dick) Faulder

HDS Faulder WW2 or shortly afterwards

HDS Faulder WW2 or shortly afterwards

Harold Dick Sewell Faulder (1918-2005) was my father.  I am currently trying to write up his life and am posting an outline that may provoke others to contribute. (more…)

18 August, 2010

William Willett (b 1856): Advocate of Daylight Saving

William Willett was the son of the William Willett who started the building company. However he is most memorable as the advocate of Daylight Saving or British Summer Time. (more…)

17 August, 2010

Ancestors outside the main paternal line.

The following family trees show my cousins (living generations though are not shown). (more…)

Wilfred Willet (b 1890): Rescued by his wife during World War One

Wilfred Leslie Willett (1890-1961), a medical student, married Eileen Stenhouse (1892-1961) in 1913 (and again in 1914). He joined the London Rifles (1/5th battalion, The London Regiment) in 1914 and was injured in December of that year, when he climbed out of the trenches at Ploegsteert to attempt to assist an injured man (Private, later acting Captain Ernest G Moore) in No Man’s Land. The injury was a severe head injury. (more…)

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