Faulder Family Genealogy

29 August, 2010

The Williamsons and Worcester

William Blizzard Williamson, the elder was born in Cork, Ireland in about 1812.  He appears in the English Census of 1841 in Kingston (upon Thames) described as an “I tinman” (possibly itinerant tinman – or tinker).  When he died in 1878 he had founded the Providence Tinplate works in Worcester (later a major part of Metal Box) and both his sons would go on to be Mayor of Worcester. (more…)

18 August, 2010

Map of Huddersfield, Yorkshire

Google Mapopen new window featuring Joseph Sewell Faulder’s family and the Lendrum and Fell Families.

Ronald Faulder: Parachuting Pioneer

Filed under: 1912-99,Faulder,Work/Business — Tags: , , , — David @ 3:10 pm
Ronald Faulder

Ronald Faulder - Parachute Pioneer

Ronald was too young to actually fight in World War 1 (although I believe he was with the RAF) but he was involved in the testing of early parachutes “Guardian Angels”.

Postscript: Many years later when members of the Parachute Regiment display team were at the Rowledge Fête, Ronald was introduced to them. This resulted in an invitation to dinner at their mess in Aldershot at which he was presented with a current Parachute Regiment tie, which he wore with great pride.

Emily Faulder: Co-founder of Universal Aunts

Emily Faulder

Emily Faulder, Co-founder of Universal Aunts

Emily Story Faulder (1883-1974), was the first child of Joseph Sewell Faulder and his wife Emily Story and was my Great Aunt.

Gertrude Maclean together with Emily Faulder set up Universal Auntsopen new window in 1921 as the original concierge service although very much focusing on looking after children – particularly those travelling alone.

Their websiteopen new window reports:

Having found a partner, Miss Emily Faulder, she [Gertrude Maclean] started her business in a little room behind a bootmaker’s in Chelsea. Their lease did not allow them to work in the afternoons, so they went, with their papers in a capacious knitting bag, to Harrods’ Ladies’ Rest Room where they received clients and applicants on a sofa in the corner. So began a business that by its 80th year had employed over three quarters of a million men and women, and undertaken over a million services. (more…)

George Henry Williamson (b 1845): Briefly MP for Worcester

George Henry Williamson was (in 1906) briefly elected Conservative and Unionist MP for Worcester before being disqualified.

It was suggested that members of his team had bribed voters to vote Conservative. After a petition by the Liberal Party the result was declared void. (more…)

William Willett (b 1856): Advocate of Daylight Saving

William Willett was the son of the William Willett who started the building company. However he is most memorable as the advocate of Daylight Saving or British Summer Time. (more…)

The family links with the Woollen trade in Yorkshire, especially Huddersfield

There are various members of the family who have been involved in various aspects of the textile industry, most notably with the Woollen Industry in Yorkshire in particular the firm of Stothart & Faulder open pdf window in John William Street, Huddersfieldopen new window. (more…)

17 August, 2010

Wilfred Willet (b 1890): Rescued by his wife during World War One

Wilfred Leslie Willett (1890-1961), a medical student, married Eileen Stenhouse (1892-1961) in 1913 (and again in 1914). He joined the London Rifles (1/5th battalion, The London Regiment) in 1914 and was injured in December of that year, when he climbed out of the trenches at Ploegsteert to attempt to assist an injured man (Private, later acting Captain Ernest G Moore) in No Man’s Land. The injury was a severe head injury. (more…)

Evelyn Faulder’s award of the Military Medal

Portrait of Evelyn Faulder MM, F.A.N.Y. by kind permission FANY (PRVC)

Portrait of Evelyn Faulder MM, F.A.N.Y. by kind permission FANY (PRVC)

Evelyn Faulder drove an Ambulance with the FANY during World War One.

  • Third daughter of Joseph Sewell Faulder & Emily Storyopen pdf window. My Great Aunt.
  • During the Great War she served (from April 1916) with the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY) in France and Flanders.  The FANY were originally set up with the rather romantic idea that horsewomen could ride out onto the battlefield and scoop up wounded soldiers and bring them back to safety.  In practice they drove heavy motor ambulances.
  • Her medal index card indicates that she achieved the rank of sergeant.
  • The London Gazette of 5 July 1918 open new window gives the following citation:

    His Majesty the KING has been pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal to the under mentioned Ladies -for distinguished services in the Field, as recorded: —
    Miss Sarah Bonnell, First Aid Nursing Yeomanry,
    Miss Evelyn Gordon-Brown, First Aid Nursing Yeomanry,
    Miss Aileen Maude Faulkner, First Aid Nursing Yeomanry,
    Miss Evelyn Faulder, First Aid Nursing Yeomanry,
    Miss Nellie Dewhurst, V.A.D., attd. First Aid Nursing Yeomanry.
    For gallantry and conspicuous devotion to duty, when an ammunition dump had been set on fire by enemy bombs and the only available ambulance for the removal of wounded had been destroyed. These ladies subsequently arrived with three ambulances, and, despite the danger arising from various explosions, succeeded in removing all the wounded. Their conduct throughout was splendid. War Office, 8th July, 1918. (more…)

The life and death of Harold Faulder (killed in action Ypres 26 April 1918)

Harold Faulder, 3rd Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment

Harold Faulder, 3rd Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment

  • Eldest son of Joseph Sewell Faulder & Emily Storyopen pdf window. My paternal Grandfather.
  • He returned from the United States (where he was working) to enlist via the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps.
  • He initially served in England with the 3rd Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment.
  • Later he served in France with the 14th Battalion of the same regiment (The 2nd Barnsley Pals), when he was acting commanding officer in the final weeks of its existence before it was disbanded.
  • He was killed in action near Ypres four days after joining the 1/4th battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment and has no known grave.
  • He was mentioned in despatches twice, but details are currently unknown.
  • There is some dispute over his rank at his death.
  • His only child, my father, was born 10 weeks after his death.

The Life of Harold Faulder (large file!)open pdf window
The Final Hours of the life of Harold Faulderopen pdf window
Commonwealth War Graves Commission recordopen new window

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