Faulder Family Genealogy

24 August, 2010

William Willett (b 1837) Founder of the building firm

There are (at least) two notable William Willetts. The most notable two are probably the father and son pair; the son (b 1856) is noted as the advocate of Daylight Saving, whilst his father is noted for founding the building firm Willetts. (more…)

23 August, 2010

The life of HDS (Dick) Faulder

HDS Faulder WW2 or shortly afterwards

HDS Faulder WW2 or shortly afterwards

Harold Dick Sewell Faulder (1918-2005) was my father.  I am currently trying to write up his life and am posting an outline that may provoke others to contribute. (more…)

18 August, 2010

Potential Ancestral Links to Groups of Overseas Faulders

The Faulder surname appears in various parts of the world:

  • Canadian Faulders (mainly in Ontario and Alberta)
  • American (United States of) Faulders (mainly in Ohio – linking back to Sebergham in Cumberland – and Pennsylvania)
  • Canadian citizen, Joseph Stanley Faulderopen new window executed in Texas
  • Australian Faulders (mainly in New South Wales – again linking back to Cumberland)
  • New Zealand Fauldersopen pdf window (based on BMD data)

Review of World War One records in the above countries is currently revealing more information.

The family links with the Woollen trade in Yorkshire, especially Huddersfield

There are various members of the family who have been involved in various aspects of the textile industry, most notably with the Woollen Industry in Yorkshire in particular the firm of Stothart & Faulder open pdf window in John William Street, Huddersfieldopen new window. (more…)

17 August, 2010

Review of Faulder Families in Cumberland

Filed under: 1837-1911,Faulder,Status: Work in Progress — Tags: , — David @ 10:32 pm

Initially concentrating on Faulders born in Cumberland (and their descendents) as detailed by the censuses of 1841-1911.  This work is being held on Ancestry.co.uk.  There would appear to be about five strands of Faulders in Cumberland.  By charting them it is possible by matching some people to unrelated strands to be certain that they are not part of our strand.  Unless, of course, tracing their ancestors gives a clue to ours!

See also existing pubic domain work on surname distributions in 1881 and 1998 open new window

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